Archives for Irish History

Traditional Dress of Ireland in the 1800’s

The traditional dress of Ireland during the early days was inspired by the Gaelic and Norse costumes. It consisted of check trews for men worn with a fringed cloak or mantle, or a short tunic for both men and women worn with a fringed cloak. Although the people of Ireland do not strictly wear their traditional costume, yet it has retained its importance through folk music and folk dance. The traditional style of Irish dressing was prohibited in the 16th century AD under sumptuary laws passed to suppress the distinctive Irish dress as the Irish were reluctance to become part
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An Irish Immigrants American Dream

I was 19 years old and sitting in a bar with all my friends, but suddenly I felt all alone… I was moving to America tomorrow. All that was going through my mind was why, but I knew I needed to escape Ireland.The small time country life of Ireland had gotten to me. I felt like I was suffocating inside. I needed to get out, and quickly at that. This was my chance. I arrived in the U.S. on a three-month visa waiver, with no job and $450 spending money in my pocket. It was either sink or swim. Everyone in
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History of Pewter

A Summary of the Nature and History of Pewter Pewter is a blend of metals made up primarily of tin with the remainder being copper, alimony, bismuth, and lead in various amounts. This blend of metals is called an alloy and the percentage of tin in pewter alloy is typically 90% or greater in modern pewter, although it can be as little as 51%. The alloy nature of pewter allows it to readily be crafted into countless items, from jewelry and decorative figurines to dinnerware, statues, collectibles, and many other things. The metals that comprise pewter are not ideal to
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Ireland Research – Idetification, geography, history, food, economy

Identification. The Republic of Ireland (Poblacht na hÉireann in Irish, although commonly referred to as Éire, or Ireland) occupies five-sixths of the island of Ireland, the second largest island of the British Isles. Irish is the common term of reference for the country’s citizens, its national culture, and its national language. While Irish national culture is relatively homogeneous when compared to multinational and multicultural states elsewhere, Irish people recognize both some minor and some significant cultural distinctions that are internal to the country and to the island. In 1922 Ireland, which until then had been part of the United Kingdom of
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The Book of Kells and Illuminated Manuscripts

The Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript from the eighth century. It is currently located at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. The images and icons in this book of gospels are Christian; however, the decorative style of the work is pre-Christian in origin. Since the decorations show both Irish and Germanic influences, they are referred to as Hiberno-Saxon art. The Book of Kells is called an insular manuscript, because its script is in a style known as “Insular majuscule,” a style which was common in Ireland between the seventh and ninth centuries. The Book of Kells represents a high
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THE IRISH IN THE UNITED STATES BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR

The emigration of the Irish to the United States in the mid-19th Century has sometimes been referred to as “from the frying pan into the fire.  Conditions which motivated the Irish to leave their homeland were deplorable in both the social and the economic sense, and those in which they lived in the new country were hardly much better. In the first few decades of the 19th Century, the population of Ireland experienced a rapid increase which was accompanied by a decrease in the land under cultivation.  This caused a recurrence of severe rural distress, a condition from which the Irish suffered earlier during famines of
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The Potato Famine of 1845

Starting in 1845 the farmers of Ireland no longer owned their land, it was taken over by the British and all the farmland had been turned into English plantations. The farmers who had been used to working for themselves had now become tenants on their own land. At this time in Ireland the potato was the most important crop throughout the whole county and Ireland had very little crop diversity. The potato farmers were very reliant on getting good crops from their land; some of this crop was sold to pay the rent and the rest was used to feed their
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