Everything you need to know about St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day began as a Christian feast day in early 17th-century Ireland and has morphed into an unlikely international phenomenon. Now every year on March 17, the Irish people and their fans celebrate the holiday across the world with parades, dancing, beer, corned beef & cabbage, and all green everything. Read on for a brief history, fun facts, traditions & tips of our favourite holiday! THE MAN BEHIND IT ALL Much is mysterious about the namesake Saint Patrick, but we do know he came to Ireland as a young Roman slave in the early 5th century and (when freed)
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Irish Fashion for St. Patrick’s Day 2017

As St. Patrick’s Day approaches and we prepare for everything to turn forty shades of green – we’re embracing Irish fashion. That doesn’t have to mean dressing head-to-toe in emerald (although no one’s stopping you!). There are also some stylish and fashion-forward ways to add an Irish theme into your look just in time for Paddy’s day! Celebrate in true Irish style with our top 5 Irish fashion picks and our styling tips on how to wear them. Pick #1: Irish Aran Crew Neck Sweater It doesn’t get more timelessly Irish than this Aran crew-neck sweater. Featuring a classic cable
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FLAT CAPS 101: A BRIEF HISTORY

  (also known as a: golf cap, driving cap, cabbie cap, longshoreman’s cap, ivy cap, duffer cap, bicycle cap, Irish cap, newsboy caps, duckbill cap, apple caps, cheese cutter, bunnet, or a Paddy cap – the list goes on!) “A cloth cap is assumed in folk mythology to represent working class, but it also denotes upper class affecting casualness. So it is undoubtedly classless, and there lies its strength. A toff can be a bit of a chap as well without, as it were, losing face.” – Geoffrey Mather     Flat and newsboy caps have been around forever; they
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The Story of Guinness

  Imagine opening a small coffee shop – your first ever business – and deciding to sign a 9,000 year lease on the space. Some would call that bravado, others sheer insanity, but that’s exactly what Arthur Guinness did on December 31, 1759 when he opened his first brewery in a dilapidated area at St. James Gate in Dublin (the least cost 45 pounds a year). We don’t know exactly what he was thinking, but it’s clear he was quite optimistic for the future!     What kind of beer was Arthur brewing? Initially, it was just light Dublin ales, but
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Irish Weddings

  Marriage in early Ireland was a lot more freewheeling than you might think. Until the Normans arrived in the 12th century, Irish couples could marry for a one year trial period, and could easily divorce or separate afterwards as well. Despite the patriarchal society, wives could own property independent of their husbands, and it was common for priests or monks to have wives.   Many of the old Irish wedding traditions that persist to this day have roots in this time. If you’re getting married and want to incorporate some Irish history and ancient ritual into your ceremony, it
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SHOPPING FOR HER: An Irish holiday gift guide for all the great women in your life.

Whether your winter holiday tradition revolves around Christmas, Hanukah, Kwanzaa, or pagan rites, gift-giving is truly a universal religion. We’ve done a round-up of some of our very favorite things here at Shamrock Gift to expedite your shopping list. Whether you’re looking for something romantic, something platonic, something more religious, something more frivolous, here’s a round-up of some of the best Irish brands in the business, all on sale for the holidays. We’ve tried to get something for everyone here, from the smallest of stocking stuffers to the more elaborate sort. 1) Something for your mom There’s truly nothing that
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ARAN STITCHES AND THEIR STORIES

Brandon Stanton, the famous photographer and creator of the blog Humans of New York, had been snapping pictures of New Yorkers and putting them online for a long time before anyone noticed. What changed? Stanton says his career really took off when he started posting mini-interviews alongside the photos that told the human stories behind the faces. The lesson is that a beautiful and striking visual on its own often comes up empty. To truly resonate with people, it helps to tell a compelling story. The Irish are world-renowned for their storytelling and ‘gift of the gab’, so perhaps it’s
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How to properly store an aran sweater

In between use of your wool sweaters or cardigans it is important that you store your garment correctly so it will increase longevity. Wool garments can be a great investment if cared for properly. Wool fibers are a natural super material, they don’t wrinkle or sag like other fabrics, they are environmentally- friendly, flame resistant, and have an amazing ability to repel water away from the skin which keeps you warm in winter and cool in the summer. Wool fibers can be bent in excess of 25,000 times without breaking or causing damage. Tip #1: Choose to fold, not hang
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The Claddagh Origin and a Good Luck Gift.

Irish heritage and culture is rich with history, tradition, and folklore. The reverence for their roots is what has created and spread a distinguishable Irish spirit. The Claddagh ring, which originated about 300 years ago, is only one example of how their present is based on their past.             The Claddagh ring , also known as a “friendship ring” or “faith ring” is an Irish birthstone or wedding ring. Its unique design features a crown atop two hands holding a birthstone heart symbolizing, “The hands are for friendship the heart is for love and the crown is for loyalty held high above.”             There are
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Traditional Dress of Ireland in the 1800’s

The traditional dress of Ireland during the early days was inspired by the Gaelic and Norse costumes. It consisted of check trews for men worn with a fringed cloak or mantle, or a short tunic for both men and women worn with a fringed cloak. Although the people of Ireland do not strictly wear their traditional costume, yet it has retained its importance through folk music and folk dance. The traditional style of Irish dressing was prohibited in the 16th century AD under sumptuary laws passed to suppress the distinctive Irish dress as the Irish were reluctance to become part
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